Destinations Europe Russia

Mamayev Kurgan Memorial in Volgograd

For anyone who knows even just a little about the history of the 2nd World War, Volgograd (then known as Stalingrad) is certainly important. In 5 months of fighting, almost 2 million people are believed to have died in fierce fighting. The main train station in the city changed hands 14 times in 6 hours at the start of the battle and the Mamayev Kurgan hill changed hands 8 times during the 5 months of fighting. Fragments of bones are still being unearthed on the hill to this day. The battle ended with a decisive Soviet victory, which many believe to be the turning point in the war and eventual defeat of Hitler. The Mamayev Kurgan Memorial in Volgograd is a must see in my opinion if you visit Russia.

Kyiv - Hero city of the Soviet Union
Kyiv – Hero city of the Soviet Union
Minsk - Hero city of the Soviet Union
Minsk – Hero city of the Soviet Union
Odessa - Hero city of the Soviet Union
Odessa – Hero city of the Soviet Union

Fight to the Bitter End Square

From the entrance of the Mamayev Kurgan Memorial in Volgograd, you can see The Motherland Calls monument in the distance and a soldier carved from rock carrying an automatic gun and a grenade at the front. The inscriptions on the rock status translate as ‘stand to death’, ‘there is no room for us on the other bank of the volga’, ‘no step backwards’, ‘every house is a fortress’ and ‘don’t bring shame upon sacred memory’. Strong stuff.

Mamayev Kurgan Memorial in Volgograd
The Motherland Calls in the distance
Mamayev Kurgan Memorial in Volgograd
Strong man

On the staircase leading up to the complex, the sides have a wall carved from stone and audio is played as if from the battle itself. A little bit unnerving but interesting. I captured some on video below.

Carved out scene of the battle
Carved out scene of the battle


Square of Heroes

The Square of Heroes at Mamayev Kurgan in Volgograd contains 6 statues, each 6 metres tall, which depict the struggles in the Battle of Stalingrad. The first is of a a wounded soldier carrying a grenade and continuing to fight. The second is of a nurse carrying a wounded soldier from the battle. Thirdly is a soldier carrying a bag of grenades with a friend/soldier lying on the ground. The fourth shows a soldier holding an officer up so he can give orders. The fifth is a soldier taking the standard from a fallen soldier. And lastly two soldiers are depicted killing a snake (a symbol of fascism) and throwing it into the Volga river.

The Square of Heroes
The Square of Heroes
Wounded soldier
Wounded soldier
Nurse carrying a wounded soldier
Nurse carrying a wounded soldier
Soldier carrying a bag of grenades
Soldier carrying a bag of grenades
Soldier holding an officer up so he can give orders
A Soldier holding an officer up so he can give orders
Soldier taking the standard from a fallen soldier
Soldier taking the standard from a fallen soldier
Soldiers killing a snake (Fascism)
Two Soldiers killing a snake (Fascism)

Square of Sorrow

The Square of Sorrow contains a sculpture of a grieving mother holding her dead son. Nearby, is the grave of an unknown soldier. The text on the grave says “Your name is unknown, but your heroic deed is eternal. Eternal fame!”.

Grieving mother
Grieving mother
Grave of the Unknown Soldier
Grave of the Unknown Soldier

Motherland is Calling

The 85 metre tall statue overlooking the city from up close!

Mamayev Kurgan Memorial in Volgograd
The Motherland Calls
Mamayev Kurgan Memorial in Volgograd
Overlooking the city
Mamayev Kurgan Memorial in Volgograd
The Motherland Calls

Hall of Military Glory

The Eternal Flame monument in Volgograd was founded on the 20th anniversary of the Soviet victory over the Nazis on the 1st February 1963. It is located in the Mamayev Kurgan memorial complex in the city. The guards change every hour every day. Watch the video below!

Mamayev Kurgan Memorial in Volgograd
The Eternal Flame
Mamayev Kurgan Memorial in Volgograd
The Names of those Who Died
Mamayev Kurgan Memorial in Volgograd
The Eternal Flame Monument with Guards

I hope you enjoyed learning about the Mamayev Kurgan Memorial in Volgograd. You can find more information from the official site. I visited another museum in Volgograd. You can read about that here as well as more about my time in Russia here.

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6 Comments

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    Eric Rafael Gamble
    March 31, 2020 at 22:31

    Wow, how beautiful. I am sad to say I know little of Vogograd (formerly Stalingrad) except in name alone. But as I become more and more interested in World War 2 History, this is a great site to learn more and the entire Mamayev Kurgan Memorial in Volgograd seems to be a perfect place to see the war from the Russian perspective rather than the American Allies side of things.
    I really love all the statues but the carvings along the stairs and of course the Eternal Flame Memorial sites may be 2 of my favorite of the entire Mamayev Kurgan Memorial site.

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    Travel with Mei and Kerstin
    March 31, 2020 at 21:12

    Interesting place full of history of WW2! We’ve never visited Russia mainly because LGBT people are not exactly very welcome there, but hopefully this will change someday. If so, we would like to see some places of this big country one day. And Volgograd is certainly a must visit.

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    Carly-Jo Twos Company
    March 31, 2020 at 19:48

    Wow the statues are amazing, I always think it’s so nice to visit somewhere where you can learn a like history too

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    WanderlustBeautyDreams
    March 31, 2020 at 14:33

    Such a great place to visit. I’m not much a history buff but would love to learn more and visit this place.

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    The Holidaymaker
    March 31, 2020 at 10:31

    What a fantastic place to visit for those history buffs or perhaps to honour family who have fought and lost their lives on that soil.

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    Lydia
    March 30, 2020 at 09:30

    Wow! These statues are incredible. It’s so rich in history, it gave me goosebumps.

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